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COVID & Landlords of Commercial & Retail Premises

News Alert: COVID & Landlords of Commercial & Retail Premises

By | Articles, Property Law

As promised, here is the latest update on the evolving situation with Landlord and Tenants on Commercial, Industrial and Retail Premises. The Prime Minister has announced this afternoon that the National Cabinet has met and has made some decisions around this space, which we have all been waiting for.

Most importantly, it has been announced that the National Cabinet have introduced a Mandatory Code which will be legislated in each State. Landlords and Tenants are required to comply with the terms of this Mandatory Code.

The code will require Landlords and Tenants to negotiate in good faith. Landlords aren’t going to be able to terminate a Lease and Tenants are going to have to comply with the remaining terms of the lease.

The Code will apply where the business of either the Landlord or the Tenant has suffered as a result of the Covid-19 Pandemic, so that either business is an eligible business under the governments recently announced Commonwealth JobKeeper program and has a turnover of less than $50 Million.

The parties are then going to have to reach an agreement whereby the proportionate amount of reduction in a Lease rental will apply in cases where the Job Keeper Program already applies to that business. The reference to the Proportionate amount is the amount of reduced turnover of the Business suffered as a result of the  Covid-19 Pandemic.

In that circumstance and if those provisions apply, then the rental will be required to be reduced proportionate to the reduction in the business (for example if a business’s turnover has reduced by 50%, that business will see a 50% reduction in the rental for the period of the Pandemic). This rent reduction can be made up of “rental waiver” and “rent deferral”.

In respect of those proportions the  “rent free” proportion must make up at least 50% of the rental relief. The “rent deferral” component can be deferred and paid back over a period of not less than 12 months, but usually will be paid back over the remaining term of the lease (for example if the remaining term of the lease is longer than 12 months it would be paid back over the entire term, however if the lease term is shorter than 12 months that tenant will still have 12 months to repay those rent monies).

Rental increases under a lease will be frozen and penalties and interest charges will not be able to be charged, nor can guarantees or bonds be called upon.

These are important changes as the landscape is constantly changing and as things arise further, I will continue to keep you updated. Please remember though any agreements reached between Landlords and Tenants must be documented as the potential disputes in the future will be greater than the problem itself.

Please keep safe and if you have any queries whatsoever please do not hesitate to contact me.

How Landlords Should Respond to COVID-19

How Landlords Should Respond to COVID-19

By | Articles, Property Law

We understand that being a Landlord at the moment is an extremely difficult time. We all await further clarification from the Federal Government as to what incentives, if any, will be offered to Commercial Landlords to assist with concessions that may need to be made with their Tenants. Some Australian Banks have announced they will defer loan repayments on loans up to $10 million dollars for Landlords that provide certain assistance to Tenants.

There are a number of incredibly important considerations for a Landlord during this time including maintaining a relationship with Tenants, ensuring that once we emerge from this crisis that your commercial premises have sustainable tenancies and businesses that can hopefully rebound and continue to operate and add value to your properties and the ongoing consideration of ensuring you have sufficient income to meet your financial needs.

With this in mind, a number of Landlords have been receiving approaches from Tenants regarding rental waivers or assistance packages. Given that we cannot be fully aware if any assistance is going to be provided to Commercial Landlords, we see the following as the 3 main options available to our Landlords at this time:

  1. Provide a “Rental Waiver” – this is a fairly simple process of waiving rental for a specific period of the lease. We would need to be specific as to whether this includes or excludes outgoings;
  2. Provide a “Rental Reduction” – this is a process where the rental may be reduced depending on the reduced capacity of the Tenant and again should be specific as to whether it includes or excludes outgoings;
  3. Provide a “Provision of a Rent Moratorium” – this would relate to a specific period where rent is frozen. This means that the rent is not payable under the lease however it is not forgiven or waived by the Landlord. The Landlord could advise that after the Rent Moratorium period the Landlord will reassess the rental during the moratorium period which should allow a Landlord to either require repayment of that rental (say over the period of the remainder of the lease or some other period determined by the Landlord) or alternatively, the Landlord could agree to forgive or reduce that rental at that time;

This last alternative allows the Landlord to defer making a final decision in the reduction or waiver of rental until further information is to hand, including the length of this current crisis and the basis on which each individual is able to recover from the downturn.

We believe the most important element of any of these solutions is that the Landlord properly document any agreement which is reached. No agreement should be reached without proper review and documentation. The reason this remains so vital is that the greatest asset that the Landlord will have is the value of their premises and potentially the ongoing tenancies. If there is dispute at a later point regarding what agreement was reached or the specific terms of that agreement or the ability of the Landlord to later make a determination, each of these may result in substantial dispute and/or

litigation at a future point in time. This has the potential to cause more damage than the current situation if in the instance the Landlord is in a dispute with a large number of its Tenants.

We would recommend that each Tenant is dealt with on a case by case basis and bound to strict confidentiality failing which any agreement may be forfeited.

It may further be prudent that:

  1. the Landlord negotiate the terms subject to final agreement and documentation to save incurring any unnecessary costs; and
  2. the costs of documenting by the agreement are either born by the Tenant or potentially on a shared basis between the parties OMB will assist with this documentation.

We believe this is an essential time for our Landlords and we look forward to providing you whatever assistance you need during this period.

COVID-19 Rent Relief

COVID-19 Rent Relief

By | Articles, Property Law

As you are all aware, we are all anxiously awaiting the announcement of the Government’s rent relief package which is expected as part of the third stimulus package, as a result of the COVID-19 crisis.

We understand that tenants are now coming forward requesting rental relief in the form of reduced rental and/or no rental for a certain period of time due to the economic crises we are currently facing. At present it is too early to know how best to fix the situation until we have a better idea of how long this crisis will last and what other relief will be forthcoming. We do suggest that where assistance is given, it is given on a case by case basis for now.

It is imperative for all Landlords and Tenants to support each other as best they can in this crisis. However, any discussions on rent abatement, short-term agreements to defer some rental and any negotiations be put on hold until we know the full extent of the Government and financial institution relief package which should roll out in the next few days and weeks. Landlords and Tenants will then be able to make an informed decision and enter into negotiations which will benefit both the Landlord and the Tenant for the foreseeable future.

It is important to remember that where the tenants have been in substantial arrears prior to the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic, those rental arrears would not form part of any relief provided but would remain in place.

Further, it is important to note that where an agreement for rental reduction or rental abatement is being offered, you might also consider reaching an agreement with your current tenants to extend the lease term and exercise options early. Any variations to Leases or agreements reached should be documented by way of the appropriate Deeds to safeguard both Landlords and Tenants.

Both Simon and his Commercial/Property Team are here to help guide you step by step through this trying time and we will be sending  further emails to you explaining the options and obligations for both Landlords and Tenants once we are in receipt of the full information from the Government in the coming days/weeks.

In the meantime, please do not hesitate to email or phone either Simon or Lisa with any queries or concerns you may have.

Stay safe!!

Force Majeure

Force Majeure: How does an ‘Act of God’ Clause Affect Your Contract

By | Articles, Property Law

On 30 January 2020, the Director General of the World Health Organisation declared the novel coronavirus COVID-19 (“Coronavirus”) outbreak around the world a “public health emergency of international concern”.

We recognise in this difficult time, many of us may be also concerned with our ongoing contractual obligations and how the unforeseeable event of Coronavirus may affect the contracts that we are parties to. In this article, we shall provide insights on what is a force majeure clause and how the Coronavirus may affect contractual obligations.

What is Force Majeure?

Force majeure is a legal concept designed to provide remedies for parties affected by an unavoidable or unforeseeable event. Common examples of force majeure events include earthquake, explosion, natural disaster, terrorism and war.

Eventhough force majeure is a civil law concept, force majeure clauses are used in Australian contracts because of its similarity to the doctrine of frustration in common law. The doctrine of frustration applies when the performance of a contract must be radically different from what was intended by the parties.

Does Force Majeure apply to the Coronavirus outbreak?

The Coronavirus is a recent new global crisis, therefore it is not likely that contracts will include express clauses referring to the event of a Coronavirus outbreak. Whilst in China, the government has issued thousands of Force Majeure Certificates for businesses relying on force majeure clauses in contracts, it is still uncertain whether the Australian government will provide similar provisions. The questions that should be addressed are:

  1. Is Coronavirus considered a force majeure? This will largely be determined by a particular clause and that specific drafting of the clause.
  2. What notice is required to be given to enact the force majeure? It is often essential that correct notice be given pursuant to the specific clause.
  3. What relief can be obtained? Often if the appropriate clause applies, the relief may be temporary for the period of time that the event occurs.
  4. Is there an obligation on either or both parties to mitigate their loss?

If there is no force majeure can the common law help?

Without new government provisions, the test required in common law is to analyse the risks the parties agreed to take and the precise wording in the contract. In addition, the party relying on the clause will need to prove to the court that the event is beyond the reasonable control of the party seeking relief.

In Australia, frustration may be applicable in the following circumstances:

  1. A change in law rendering performance illegal. In the current situation, if the law requires the quarantine of a personal service provider, the service provider will be frustrated by such unexpected event as not quarantining and performing personal services to other individuals will be considered illegal.
  2. Physical destruction of the subject matter of the contract. In the situation of Coronavirus, an example would be if goods are contaminated and required to be destroyed. In such event, if the goods are being traded, the destruction of the goods may render the contract frustrated due to unexpected events.
  3. Restraint by injunction. In the landmark case of Codelfa Construction Pty Ltd v State Rail Authority of NSW, construction work noise affected the local residents and work shifts needed to be reduced as a result of injunctions. The majority of the court considered that the contract had been frustrated. In the current situation, if the government restrains trade by injunction due to infected personnels, this may give cause to frustration in contract.

It is important to note that irrespective of the magnitude of the Coronavirus outbreak, parties to a contract are still under an obligation to provide notice if the party seeks to rely on a force majeure clause or the doctrine of frustration under common law.

Force Majeure in Property Contracts

In Queensland, there is no automatic right to pull out of a contract even in the event that a property is damaged. In addition, most Queensland property contracts indicate that “time is of the essence”, this means time limits must be strictly observed in all circumstances and there is no automatic right for a party to extend dates because of delays.

Property Purchase and Sale Contracts

In the standard Real Estate Institute of Queensland Contract for Houses and Residential Land (“the Contract”), clause 6.2 provides a Suspension of Time clause for events when a party is unable to perform a Settlement Obligation solely as a consequence of a Delay Event. Such Event is defined in clause 6.2(8)(b) to include:

  1.  A tsunami, flood, cyclone, earthquake, bushfire or other act of nature;
  2. Riot, civil commotion, war, invasion or a terrorist act;
  3. An imminent threat of an event in paragraphs (i) or (ii); or
  4. Compliance with any lawful direction or order by a Government Agency.

If you are currently negotiating a real estate contract, it is important for a special clause to be inserted in regards to Coronavirus/a pandemic.

If the contract has already been signed, it is important to note that you are only entitled to an extension if the other party agrees to an extension. In the current circumstance, if you become aware that there may be a potential delay due to the outbreak, it is important to communicate with the other party as soon as possible and negotiate a new settlement date.

Conclusion

Given that there is no clarity yet as to when the Coronavirus outbreak will be contained, it is important for parties under contractual obligations to prepare for circumstances where the relevant contractual obligations may be affected. Consult with us for advice appropriate to your situation.

If you are in current contract negotiations, you should certainly consider including a force majeure clause that will protect you from the consequences of being unable to perform contractual obligations due to Coronavirus and other similar biological disasters.

ARE YOU LEGALLY PROTECTED FROM BUSHFIRES?

Are You Legally Protected from Bushfires?

By | Articles, Property Law

This month Bushfires are raging across Queensland and destroying lives, homes and valuable properties along the way. The current situation across both Queensland and New South West is dire, with 50 bushfires burning in Queensland and 60 burning in NSW. At least three people have lost their lives to the fires and many others missing and injured. There are over 150 homes destroyed by blazes. Experts have warned that “this disaster is far from over and the worst may be yet to come with summer ahead.” With Christmas holidays just ahead, many Aussies may also travel for holidays, leaving their properties vulnerable to potential risks.

In this article, OMB Solicitors would like to discuss some of the important legal preparation Queenslanders should do.

Insurance

  • Make sure your insurance is up to date, and has the right cover for fire and flood.
  • If you are letting your property, you’ll need to let your insurance company know you’re no longer living there and arrange landlord’s insurance. Your tenant will probably want to get contents insurance and many companies require door and window locks to be of a certain standard.
  • If you are letting your property for short-term rentals (e.g. Airbnb, Stayz, Wotif etc.), you must check if your policy is compatible for this purpose. Certain policies may also distinguish between professionally managed properties or self-managed properties.
  • Consider obtaining Insurance advice about securing life, TPD and trauma insurances.
  • If your property gets damaged, be prepared to lodge an insurance claim soon after the event.

Emergency contacts

  • Keep a list of emergency contacts you may need for dealing with recovery from a disaster.

Important Documents

  • Prepare or update your Will and Enduring Power of Attorney. We recommend seeking proper legal advice from us when it comes to setting up a Will and/or Enduring Power of Attorney.
  • Prepare an important documents kit, including a description of your home and a list of your valuable belongings. Compiling passwords and keeping this with your estate planning documents is also a handy hint.

In the event of a disaster you can contact Gold Coast Lawyers at OMB Solicitors at 07 5555 0000 for legal advice. We are here to help.

buying property tips for gold coast solicitors

5 Property Buying Tips You Need to Know

By | Articles, Property Law

On a list of stressful life experiences, buying a property consistently ranks near the top. And with good reason. It is a huge financial commitment.

Luckily, there are a few simple ways to make the process a little bit easier. Here are five property buying tips that can help reduce the stress of the experience.

Get proper advice from qualified professionals

Perhaps the single most important step you can take to ensure a trouble-free property buying process is to enlist the help of qualified professionals. A banker, accountant or lender can determine how much you can afford to spend. A real estate agent can help you find a property in that price range. And a lawyer can help you avoid making costly mistakes by identifying issues including, but not limited to:

  • Improper building additions or renovations that may have to be removed or changed at your expense.
  • Problems with current title deeds and legal ownership of the property that may complicate the deal or cause it to fall through.
  • Legal matters that can have adverse affects on property value and development.

A lawyer well versed in commercial and residential real estate can also help you avoid potential pitfalls by reviewing any and all relevant documents before you sign them.

Don’t let your emotions govern your decisions

When buying a property, falling in love at first sight is not always a good thing. If anything, it can sometimes be counterproductive. This is because the actual purchase is strictly a business and financial transaction, and should be handled as such.

While it is important to keep this in mind throughout the process, it is especially important when you inspect the property. Remember, sellers will sometimes use ‘smoke and mirrors’ such as cosmetic upgrades to conceal serious structural deficiencies. Even something as simple as a fresh coat of paint can hide significant damage. Sometimes, the current owner is simply unaware of significant issues with the house. In either case, you should be careful to look beyond the aesthetics.

Once you’ve done your own inspection, hire a professional inspector, who will easily identify both minor and significant issues. If need be, you can get an architecture report, which will also identify any outstanding issues and save you money in the long run.

Be sure to read the fine print

By their nature, real estate contracts are complex legal and financial documents. Even so, it is important that you read it thoroughly and ask your lawyer or other relevant professional about any aspects of the contract you don’t understand before you sign it.

By taking this simple step, you can easily identify potential issues that would otherwise be expensive or take a lot of time to address in the long run.

Identify land use and related issues early on

There’s nothing more aggravating than buying a property based on the assumption that you can make certain changes or use it in a certain way – only to find out afterwards that you can’t. That’s why it’s important to research (or have your lawyer research) any rules and regulations that dictate how the property can be used or changed. Examples include restrictive covenants or planning overlays.

Don’t assume the property valuation is accurate

Basically, there are three key issues at the crux of every residential and commercial real estate transaction:

  • the asking price;
  • what the buyer expects or is willing to pay;
  • what constitutes a fair/reasonable/acceptable offer.

Accurate valuation of the property is important because it affects all three of these issues. As the winning bidder at auction, or as a buyer who signed an unconditional contract, an accurate valuation ensures that you paid a fair price. On the other hand, an inaccurate valuation may cause you to pay more than what the property is really worth.  And because nobody wants to do that, it’s advisable to use an accredited professional to ascertain an accurate valuation.

In summary, purchasing a property can be an overwhelming experience, especially if you are doing it for the first time. But it doesn’t have to be. You can make the process easier by consulting qualified professionals, approaching it rationally rather than emotionally, reading contracts carefully and asking plenty of questions before signing them. Identifying land use issues early on and enlisting the services of an accredited valuer are also important steps you can take to achieve peace of mind.

To learn more about how we can help you purchase a property, contact our Gold Coast lawyers today.

Redevelopment

The Pitfalls of Buying a Property with the Objective of Redeveloping it

By | Articles, Property Law

When entering into any contract for the purchase of property, it is important to ensure that all bases are covered and both parties know what is expected from them. When purchasing a property for redevelopment, there are a few extra steps that buyers should take to ensure they are aware of how they can deal with land they are looking to develop. Developers should seek additional advice and information about the property, as well as ensuring allowances are made in their contracts, so they are not faced with any nasty surprises after settlement.

In any contractual negotiations, conducting due diligence to ascertain as much information on a property as possible is crucial. Here at OMB Solicitors, it is standard practice to include various searches in our conveyance of purchase matters. Where property is purchased for redevelopment however, we recommend to our clients that specific searches and additional expert advice is also sought. It is important that such information is gathered, so that any restrictions or issues with the property which may affect redevelopment are brought to light. Seeking review and recommendation from sources, including but not limited to, town planners, engineers and surveyors for example, allows purchasers to have the greatest understanding of the lengths and limitations a development project may encounter.

Another tool we suggest prospective developers consider is the Gold Coast City Council’s ‘City Plan‘. The City Plan outlines, maintains and protects the Gold Coast community’s intentions for future development. A crucial part of the City Plan which developers must consider is zoning. Zoning is the categorical assignment of areas around the Gold Coast into ‘zones’ which ultimately affect how land can be used and (re)developed. It is important that developers consider the zone property is located within so they are aware of the restrictions and requirements which may be enforced.

Not only should developers conduct such due diligence, they should also ensure that their contract provide allowances so this information can be sought prior to a developer being locked into a deal. Special Conditions can be included in contracts so that purchasers have time to conduct these investigations and terminate a contract without penalty in the event the due diligence does not stack up.

The inclusion of special conditions which stipulate the contract to be ‘subject to’ the satisfaction or undergoing of such searches or research should be a non-negotiable term of a contract if a developer is planning to redevelop a parcel of land. If these additions and changes are not made to contracts, purchasers may find themselves in breach where they have taken excess time to meet conditions, or unable to terminate a contract if the property can not be used as envisioned.

Redeveloping property can be a rewarding and exciting time for purchasers. It is important however, that due diligence is undertaken, and proper additions are made to contracts so that pitfalls can be avoided. Seeking expert advice is crucial to ensure that property can be developed as proposed. Ensuring that contracts reflect the intentions and expectations of both parties is also fundamental in achieving a successful outcome for all involved.

Contact Gold Coast Lawyers today if you need any further advice on the preliminary actions that should be taken when redeveloping property, or if you would like to find out more about how contracts can be drafted to suit your redevelopment needs.

buying off the plan risks

The Risks of Buying Off The Plan

By | Podcasts, Property Law

On face value, the notion of buying something you haven’t yet seen poses plenty of questions, but yet plenty of people will buy a property that hasn’t yet been built and the decision has been solely based on the planned construction. Is this approach riddled with legal risks? In this podcast, Gold Coast Lawyers at OMB Solicitors’ Cameron Marshall discusses the matter.

TRANSCRIPT

Dan:  Cameron, is this a risky business?

Cameron: It can be, but as long as you do your inquiries and at the end of the day when the building is constructed you are happy with what’s been built as opposed to what you thought you were going to buy, it can all work out very well and very happy for everybody.

Dan: So, where is the starting point for somebody that’s you know, considering one of these buy off the plan proposals?

Cameron: Well the first thing you’d need to do is have a look at the plan and make sure you’re happy with what’s going to be built and then when you get to the end of the road and when it is built and you’re about to settle, you need to make sure that was what built was what you thought you were buying, so I’ve seen a lot of examples where people have got to the end of the day, ready for settlement and what is built is not what they thought they were indeed going to get. Possibly one balcony might be missing I’ve seen before and other examples are where a lot owner doesn’t even have access to their own property across common property, so they’re the little things that can come up.

Dan: Cameron. In your experience are there things that you see that quite often occur?

Cameron:  The main things are the common property areas and their exclusive use of those areas. They’re often forgotten about or changed in the building process. It’s something that’s very important when you’re buying, especially a unit of the plan, so you need to make sure again what you’re buying at the end of the day is what you contracted to buy and if you haven’t, you need to speak to a solicitor about it.

Dan:  Yeah, I was just going to say that. Is getting advice even prior to signing the paperwork a smart step?

Cameron: Oh yes, very much. Especially when you’ve got a large amount of disclosure that’s required in an off the plan construction contract, so you need to be fully aware of what can change and what can legally change through the process because the builder is allowed to make certain minor adjustments in the process themselves.

Dan: Cameron, thanks for joining me.

Cameron: Thank you very much.

 

 

Protecting My Interests in Property

Protecting My Interests in Property

By | Articles, Property Law

A Caveat is a legal document registered on the Title of a property which generally prevents dealings with that property without the lodger’s consent. Once registered on Title, it acts as a warning or formal notice to advise the public that someone (the Lodger) has an interest in the land or property.

The most common query regarding a Caveat is can it be lodged to protect the recovery of the debt? The general answer is no. A Caveat can only be lodged when there is a “caveatable interest” and this generally means an equitable or legal interest in the land or a right, power, or privilege over the land which is the basis of the Caveat. There are a number of examples of this including an equitable mortgage, constructive trust or agreement which provides that a property is charged or encumbered with the repayment of a loan. These are just some of the examples that may constitute a caveatable interest; however, it is important to note that it is more than a mere claim for damages.

The Caveat, however, is a very powerful tool which prevents the party from dealing with their property and may heavily impact the owner of that property by preventing them from selling or mortgaging their property. As a result there is substantial liability which may be imposed on a person who lodges or continues with the caveat without reasonable grounds. In the event that another party suffers loss or damage as a result of that lodgement the lodger of the caveat may be liable for those damages or loss.

Any party wanting to lodge a Caveat should seek specialist legal advice and it should bear in mind that all times the potential liability that may attach if the grounds for lodging that Caveat are insufficient and the caveat causes loss or damage. The general rule for a caveat is that it will automatically lapse after a three-month period unless proceedings to support that Caveat are commenced. There are certain types of Caveat that will be non-lapsing however.

Buying a Property on the Gold Coast? Contact OMB Solicitors today.

Before You Buy a Property on the Gold Coast, Listen to This!

By | Podcasts, Property Law

The Gold Coast if you know, is renowned for its diverse property appeal, but in 2018 property experts are saying that infrastructure in the Northern and Central suburbs will contribute substantially to an already booming market, not to mention the impact of the Commonwealth Games on the city, but if you’re an outsider contemplating buying into this flourishing market, there’s probably a few idiosyncrasies along with the stable cold hard truths, you need to know before buying that strategically positioned unit on the 24th floor.

Simon Bennett of OMB Solicitors discusses the risks and opportunities.

Dan: Simon is all this glitz and glamour of living on the coast potentially at risk of not doing your due diligence?

Simon Bennett: I think that’s right. I think sometimes purchases of property on the Gold Coast get caught up in the excitement and the glitz and glamour and fail to probably undertake what I would consider basic due diligence when looking to purchase property. Now that could be split up. I think there are two real types of category of buyer. You’ve got your owner-occupiers, so someone who’s buying to actually live in the property. Then you’ve got an investor who is someone simply making a property investment. I think there’s really key characteristic differences between those two.

Dan: How should each of those cohorts look at the market?

Simon Bennett: Well an owner needs to look at livability. Am I going to be happy living there? They really need to pay attention when they’re buying into a body corporate about bylaws and rules because these are things that will govern how they can occupy that property. They really need to determine whether they’re going to be happy living there, as well as whether it’s a good commercial purchase. Where the investor on the other hand, really shouldn’t be looking at, do I like it? Does it feel good? It’s really a numbers game. How’s the return? What’s the likely capital growth? They need to be a little bit more removed from the feel, and as I said before, getting caught up so much in what they might like because they need to remember they’re not going to be living there.

Dan: Simon, for the owner I assume that really looking at the bylaws is going to be important, and maybe even so for the investor. Particularly if they’re looking at Airbnb and those other opportunities, but if we talk about the owner first up is what about the bylaws that they should be really analysing or wanting to understand?

Simon Bennett: Sure. Well the bylaws in really basic terms are set as the rules and regulations by which the owner or the occupier of a unit in a body corporate are governed by. Now these are designed to protect an owner, but they also restrict you. Now when I say they protect, what they do is, they govern all owners and say for example, you can’t change the external appearance of your unit. You can’t hang your washing out over your balcony, so that the view of the building doesn’t get the look of a slum or a building you might see in Hong Kong for example, whereby the washing is all hung out the side. That protects values, but it also restricts what you can do. Another common one is you can’t have loud late night parties, which restricts your use of your unit, but also it protects the general common ownership from being disturbed by other owners.

Dan: Simon, is there a divergence among what bylaws are from a complex to complex? I’m assuming that there may well be some that have very, very tight bylaws and others that are a little bit looser.

Simon Bennett: Yeah, that’s correct. It’s important to look at these if you have a specific concern. One of the most common ones we see is with pets. Now this is a really sensitive topic. Quite often a purchaser, or a potential purchaser in a complex, will not go ahead with a purchase if they can’t take their animals with them. It’s important to read those. Know what your specific requirements are if you are planning on letting, if you are planning on living there and taking animals et cetera. To check those bylaws have an experienced, qualified lawyer read through them, and point out what is important to you.

Dan: Okay. Let’s talk about the investor. There’s all this hullabaloo and excitement around Airbnb, and stories about people making thousands and thousands of dollars each week on their property. The investor that wants to buy, say, a unit at Surfers Paradise has got visions of being able to Airbnb it every night. What do they need to ensure is in those bylaws to allow them to do that without sort of running foul with the body corporate?

Simon Bennett: Sure. It’s important to read the bylaws and find out if there are any restrictions in the bylaws on short-term letting, then a qualified lawyer would need to look further beyond that and see whether that constitutes a valid bylaw or not. It may depend on what the original approval or the development approval was granted to that building for. If there were restrictions on what that building could be used for it would come back to town planning, but it is important as an investor to work out what you can and can’t do with it, not just with that letting process, but whether you’re going to put it with an onsite agent, whether there is an onsite letting agent, or whether you’re able to use a commercial letting agent maybe down the road.

Dan: Okay. Now in terms of the contract, or signing the contract, I mean it never ceases to amaze me how many people will go down and chase the cut-price conveyancing law firm to do their work. When in fact it’s a significant asset for many people. What are the risks of going down that path?

Simon Bennett: Yeah. Look, it amazes me as well. I quite often use the analogy of an individual who’s getting brain surgery doesn’t go out and find the cheapest brain surgeon. You generally want to find the best. For most people, buying a property of this nature is one of the biggest monetary financial transactions they will undertake in their life. They shouldn’t be looking at, necessarily, the cheapest option. They should be looking at getting really good value for their money. They should be looking at engaging an expert in that area. I am an accredited specialist by the Queensland Law Society in Property Law. That is an accreditation given by the Queensland Law Society saying that this person is an expert in that area. It’s really important because let’s get to the contract that you mentioned. Realistically, before you sign a contract you should give your solicitor an opportunity to peruse it for you.

Simon Bennett: As a general rule at OMB Solicitors we’re more than happy to look at our client’s contracts before they sign them, no obligation, and no charge. We would rather look at these contracts for our clients up front to say, “Yes, it’s all fine. You’re okay to sign it or gee, we really need to mend these clauses.” Quite often it’s something really technical. It may be the use of a simple word, may or must or something of that nature, that may need to be amended, but the ramifications are quite huge. What we say is before you execute your contracts, get them checked just for piece of mind. That way we don’t have to sort out problems later on.

Dan: Getting quality legal advice just makes common sense.

Simon Bennett: It does. I must say there is a misconception that you want to buy, I want to sell, straightforward it just happens and people go and put the importance on that transaction that they should. I can tell you this is that these transactions often have major problems, end up in court being litigated, and huge amounts of money are spent. The benefit of having an experienced practitioner looking after your matter is that they will have the experience to, not only deal with problems when they come up, but most often anticipate the problem before it becomes a major issue and cut it off at the pass, and things will run smoothly through.

Dan: Yeah. It’s very true isn’t it, I mean given that OMB Solicitors is a diverse practise law firm, you’ve got their back there should things go off track.

Simon Bennett: That’s right. Quite often throughout the course of a matter like this if we do have an issue I will go and consult with our specific body corporate team about body corporate issues, or I will go and discuss with our litigation team what if A, B, or C occurs how do we stand if that ended up in a court? We can use those other areas of expertise in the firm to assist the client quite informally before the problem arises.

 

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